Thursday, November 19, 2009

"A New Nation ..."

One of the most famous and enduring speeches ever made was given of this day, November 19.

Because of his pressing demands, the speaker was invited as a courtesy. When he accepted, they were both surprised and pleased.

His speech was a little over 2 minutes, but has been an enduring profile of the man's beliefs in American democracy and ideology.

Do you know the man and the speech?

On November 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address at the Soldiers' National Cemetery dedication ceremonies in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. After the Battle of Gettysburg, which took place from July 1-4, 1863, the citizens of the Pennsylvania town were over-burdened with the task of caring for the injured and burying the dead. With nearly 6,000 dead bodies left behind by the Union and Confederate armies, and hundreds more dying each day, the state of Pennsylvania purchased land on Cemetery Hill as a burial ground for the fallen soldiers. State officials invited President Lincoln to the dedication ceremonies as a courtesy, and were surprised when he accepted the invitation to come and speak. The day of the ceremony, Lincoln's address lasted a little over two minutes, but soon became a famous representation of Lincoln's beliefs in American democracy and ideology.

Today, only five copies of the speech exist, each with the immortal words written by President Lincoln himself, "...that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth."

Primary Sources and more

3 comments:

  1. the immortal words written by President Lincoln himself, "...that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth."

    It sure will be nice when this humanist government - of, by and for the people - will actually be allowed to grant complete equality, civil rights and peace to ALL of the people.

    And that some of the people will cease and desist their efforts to trample, oppress and engage in violence other of the people because of their personal religious beliefs.

    Would that the religion of James be re-restablished in Ameria...

    Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world.

    When I see people engaging in this type of religious practice, then I know that they have genuine "Judeo-Christian" values - when I see them focused on other activities including practicing oppression and their tongue practicing partisan politics, I know that James statement "his religion is worthless" is valid.

    Patrick

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  2. Thanks ,
    Also did not know about the hardship the town's people were going through. Quite informative .

    Mick

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  3. Because American government is "of the people, by the people, for the people", American Christians and Church leaders should be participating in the political process, rather than separating themselves from it. Separation of Church and State is not something Churches should be giving any credibility to, since it is not a biblical concept. The Bible makes it clear that every Christian is a temple of God, therefore, where the Christian goes, Christ's Spirit, Word, and power goes. Christianity is not something that a person can take off at the door before entering a government facility. This political mindset is a joke! Christians are commanded to go out into their worlds and speak for God. Ministry is not something that only happens in temple buildings by a few select leaders. Church leaders exist only to train up an army to go out into the world and make a difference for Christ. Government can stop religious institutions, but it cannot stop an advancing army of God's people who take seriously their faith and duty to bring Christ into every area of personal life in which they live.

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