Friday, September 25, 2015

Joe Biden--A Conflicted Catholic

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Vice President Joe Biden, a Roman Catholic, recently told Father Matt Malone, editor in chief of the Catholic "America" magazine, "I'm prepared to accept that the moment of conception there's human life and being, but I'm not prepared to say that to other God-fearing, non-God fearing people who have a different view."

It must be equally conflicting for Mr. Biden to accept his church's view that marriage is only between a man and a woman.

Mr. Biden has not been timid in using his political power to force beliefs he claims "not" to believe on the American public---why would he be timid about those values he says he "does" believe, yet forceful in advancing those he "does not" believe?

He says he cannot impose a "precise view" which stems from his personal beliefs.

Has he been "imposing views" that he does not believe in?

Compromise is always conflicting. And confusing. And destructive.


It is also the mother of Political Correctness. And raw political ambition.

Before the Pope arrived, Biden told America magazine, "I'm excited quite frankly, as a practicing Catholic, I am really excited the whole world is getting to see what are the basic essential elements of what constitutes Catholicism," calling Pope Francis "the embodiment of the Catholic doctrine I was raised with."

In 2012, ABC News reported that both Biden and Obama had voted against a bill making it illegal to take a minor to another state to get an abortion in order to get around parental consent laws.

Was this not imposing the beliefs of Planned Parenthood, who was behind the bill, on parents who oppose abortion and believe in parental authority?

Ironically, ABC was trying to praise Biden as a messenger for abortion rights, but admitted he is "an imperfect messenger" while celebrating that he had moved toward the abortion agenda over his time in politics.

Live Action, a pro-life organization, says while Biden may have been a little more moderate a long time ago, in more recent years he has consistently favored Roe v Wade and has voted for taxpayer funding of abortion.

They also note that since 2001, Biden has received 100% rating from the abortion lobby.

Live Action gives an in depth, excellent analysis of the Biden interview with the "American" magazine. Rather than recap it, I strongly encourage you to read it.

Biden has also opposed the teaching of his church and assisted in imposing so-called same-sex "marriage" on those "God-fearing people" who do not believe in it.

It was Biden who famously pushed Obama to come out in full support of redefining marriage. David Axelrod, Obama's long time adviser and personal friend, later revealed in his book that Obama had supported redefining marriage for a long time, but Biden had been the catalyst to cause him to go public with his beliefs.

How is this not imposing one belief over another?

In fact, the Wall Street Journal wrote an article in 2009 explaining how "Joe Biden wrecked the judicial confirmation process" for the purpose of imposing his own political beliefs on others.

They reference how Biden, Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, destroyed President Reagan's 1987 nomination of conservative Robert Bork for the Supreme Court.

Prior to Biden's attack on Bork, a Yale law professor, had been given the highest ratings as a constitutional scholar by his peers. Biden's attack was not mere ideological opposition---it was character assassination.

Last June when the Supreme Court ruled against natural marriage in favor of redefining marriage, the Business Insider wrote an article outlining how Joe Biden led the political fight "that helped sow the seeds for Friday's Supreme Court decision legalizing gay marriage."

We're not buying it, Joe.

It's very difficult to actually believe in two opposing beliefs. In fact, it is impossible.

Jesus put it like this: "But if your eye is bad, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the light that is in you is darkness, how great is that darkness! No one can serve two masters; for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and wealth" (Matthew 6:23-24).

In the Old Testament book of Kings we see a profile of how compromised and conflicted beliefs perpetuate themselves. In II Kings (17:41) the prophet writes, "Even while these people were worshiping the Lord, they were serving their idols. To this day their children and grandchildren continue to do as their ancestors did."

In I Kings (18:21) we read, "Elijah went before the people and said 'How long will you waver between two opinions? If the Lord is God, follow Him, but if Baal is God, follow him. But the people said nothing'."

Silence is sin.

And the biblical record gives us the results of "grey" thinking, when black and white is required.

In defense of his own ministry, the Apostle Paul wrote (Gal. 1:10), "Am I now trying to win the approval of human beings, or God? Or am I trying to please people? If I were still trying to please people, I would not be a servant of Christ."

This is a question I believe all biblical Christians must ask themselves. Especially pastors and those who lead.

Be Faithful. Be Convinced. Be Faithful.


4 comments:

  1. Nobody like it when people slither. We all can appreciate people with some backbone, even though we might not agree with them and the things they are for politically.

    I want to see people in government that are not ashamed to walk uprightly, and get back up when they fail, and be able to admit when they slipped back, or fell back a time or two (or more even) but get back up and going the right way, a consistent moral way, whether anyone near them likes it or not.

    I suppose they have the same worries and fears we all face at times about loosing this or that, but for the poor people who don't have much of anything and get by, and for those who have little, when politicians have so much, it seems like it can be more irritating to see, because we think, "Why should they care if they loose their position, or employment, or some money? Don't they have enough to retire right now, become a nobody and just spend their days fishing or something?", which is about the best many of us could ever hope for.

    Or maybe they're afraid of becoming a President, a good one, because becoming a lousy one can look to be a whole lot easier.

    When we vote, let's look for those who have desirable character.

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  2. I was just looking at the life of Buford Pusser, a TN sheriff, and read about an assassination attempt on him, that killed his wife. When it comes to people in high political office, isn't it only the good ones that get killed by a bullet? We are not supposed to be scared of bullets for there are worse things that can happen to a man than being shot and wounded, or killed.

    Even good people fail sometimes.

    When does political corruption get so bad we look for a sheriff like Buford Pusser?
    Maybe now. Now is the time for leadership and I believe the polls are showing it.

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  3. Jesus said that if we deny him before men, that he will deny us before the Father. (Matt 10:33) It has been said that truth has a name.

    ReplyDelete
  4. It seems to me that courage begins when we confess Jesus and the truth before men.

    ReplyDelete

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